Stunning ’60s Fashion Photography by Henry Clarke

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Born in Los Angeles in 1918, Henry Clarke, a renowned fashion photographer, discovered his calling in 1945 whilst working as an accessorist at Condé Nast in New York. During an encounter with the Cecil Beaton during a photography session at Vogue’s studio, Clarke was entranced by the photographic image. He promptly abandoned his fashion job, borrowed a Rolleiflex camera and began taking pictures.

Fashion photography by Henry Clarke in the 1960s
Deciding to try his luck abroad, Clarke moved to Paris in 1949. There his friend, Robert Randall, reintroduced him to the fashion world. He quickly found work at Fémina, L’Album de Figaro and Harper’s Bazaar.
The next year, Clarke began a collaboration with the French, English and American editions of Vogue that would last more than a quarter-century. With the help of women like Suzy Parker, Ann Sainte Marie and Bettina who were the most glamorous models of the day, he captured the elegance of the modern woman: young, lively, carefree and seductive.
In the 1960s, Diana Vreeland, the formidable editor of Vogue, sent him to such exotic locations as Syria, Iran, India and Mexico to create exciting fashion layouts.
Upon his death in 1996, it was revealed that Henry Clarke had named the Institut Pasteur as universal legatee of his estate. He bequeathed his historical collection of photographs to the Musée de la Mode et du Costume in Paris.
These stunning photos are part of his work that Henry Clarke took portraits of classic beauties in the 1960s.
Model in pink dress, 1960

Tamara Nyman, 1962

Vogue, October 1962

Veruschka, 1964

Wilhelmina wearing a crêpe evening dress by Gustave Tassell, 1964

Verushka wearing an Emilio Pucci bikini top with a long wrapped skirt, the print is Egyptian inspired in purples, greens, yellows and white, Brazil, 1965

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